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Preventing suicide by influencing mass-media reporting. The Viennese experience 1980–1996

Abstract

This paper reports a field experiment concerning mass-media and suicide. After the implementation of the subway system in Vienna in 1978, it became increasingly acceptable as means to commit suicide, with the suicide rates showing a sharp increase. This and the fact that the mass-media reported about these events in a very dramatic way, lead to the formation of a study-group of the Austrian Association for Suicide Prevention (ÖVSKK), which developed media guidelines and launched a media campaign in mid-1987. Subsequently, the media reports changed markedly and the number of subway-suicides and -attempts dropped more than 80% from the first to the second half of 1987, remaining at a rather low level since. Conclusions regarding the possible reduction of imitative suicidal behaviour by influencing mass-media-reports are drawn. Experiences from the media campaign are presented, as well as considerations about further research.

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Etzersdorfer, E., Sonneck, G. Preventing suicide by influencing mass-media reporting. The Viennese experience 1980–1996. Archives of Suicide Research 4, 67–74 (1998). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1009691903261

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1009691903261

  • imitation
  • suicide
  • mass-media
  • prevention
  • Werther effect