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Increased insect resistance in transgenic wheat stably expressing trypsin inhibitor CMe

Abstract

Proteinase inhibitors have been proposed to function as plant defence agents against herbivorous pests. We have introduced the barley trypsin inhibitor CMe (BTI-CMe) into wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) by biolistic bombardment of cultured immature embryos. Of the 30 independent transgenic wheat lines selected, 16 expressed BTI-CMe. BTI-CMe was properly transcribed and translated as indicated by northern and western blot, with a level of expression in transgenic wheat seeds up to 1.1% of total extracted protein. No expression was detected in untransformed wheat seeds. Functional integrity of BTI-CMe was confirmed by trypsin inhibitor activity assay. The significant reduction of the survival rate of the Angoumois grain moth (Sitotroga cerealella, Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae), reared on transgenic wheat seeds expressing the trypsin inhibitor BTI-CMe, compared to the untransformed control confirmed the potential of BTI-CMe for the increase of insect resistance. However, only early-instar larvae were inhibited in transgenic seeds and expression of BTI-CMe protein in transgenic leaves did not have a significant protective effect against leaf-feeding insects.

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Altpeter, F., Diaz, I., McAuslane, H. et al. Increased insect resistance in transgenic wheat stably expressing trypsin inhibitor CMe. Molecular Breeding 5, 53–63 (1999). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1009659911798

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1009659911798

  • transgenic plants
  • trypsin inhibitor
  • insect resistance
  • Triticum aestivum L.