Marital Status and Adjustment 1 Year Post-Spinal-Cord-Injury

Abstract

The current study employed a case-control design to examine the impact of marital status on adjustment among individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) 1 year post-injury. Two groups of 53 individuals (i.e., single versus married individuals) were matched case-for-case on age (i.e., within 10 years), education, gender, race, and lesion level. Although not specifically matched, etiology of SCI, and number of rehospitalizations and days rehospitalized during the past year were not significantly different between groups. Outcome measures included the Satisfaction With Life Scale, the Craig Handicap Assessment and Reporting Technique (CHART), and the SF-12. Results indicated that overall self-reported QOL was significantly lower among single individuals as compared to their matched married counterparts. Similarly, self-reported handicap was significantly higher among single individuals, particularly in the areas of social integration and economic self-sufficiency. In contrast, overall physical and mental health were not different across groups.

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Putzke, J.D., Elliott, T.R. & Richards, J.S. Marital Status and Adjustment 1 Year Post-Spinal-Cord-Injury. Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings 8, 101–107 (2001). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1009555910604

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  • marriage
  • quality of life
  • spinal cord injury
  • life satisfaction