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International Journal of Historical Archaeology

, Volume 4, Issue 3, pp 191–216 | Cite as

Matchlocks, Flintlocks, and Saltpetre: The Chronological Implications for the Use of Matchlock Muskets among Ottoman-Period Bedouin in the Southern Levant

  • Benjamin Adam Saidel
Article

Abstract

This paper examines the chronological implications for the prolonged use of matchlock muskets by the Bedouin during the Ottoman Period (1453–1918). Although the technology behind the matchlock ignition system is from the fifteenth century, this weapon was used by many Bedouin until the beginning of the twentieth century. As a result, the presence of gun parts from matchlock muskets poses a potential problem for identifying Bedouin occupations from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries in the southern Levant and in northern Arabia. This issue is heightened by the paucity of diagnostic artifacts found at archaeological sites associated with the Bedouin during the Ottoman Period.

Bedouin chronology gun parts technology 

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© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Benjamin Adam Saidel
    • 1
  1. 1.Manchester

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