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Developmental Antecedents of Sexual Coercion in Juvenile Sexual Offenders

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Sexual Abuse: A Journal of Research and Treatment

Abstract

Previous research has linked adult sex offending behavior to a multiplicity of variables, including juvenile delinquency and the experience of childhood abuse. The purpose of this study was to explore developmental pathways among childhood abuse, juvenile delinquency, and personality dimensions possibly conducive to adolescent sexual coercion. Using a retrospective self-report inventory, we measured the extent to which juvenile sexual offenders experienced childhood trauma, engaged in adolescent delinquency, and exhibited particular dispositions and cognitive biases. The effects of childhood and adolescent antecedents on sexual coerciveness were then analyzed through simultaneous multiple regression path analyses. Results suggest that sexual compulsivity and hypermasculinity, through misogynistic fantasy behavior, significantly discriminate verbally and physically coercive juvenile offenders from those offenders who do not report using force in their offenses. Results also suggest that alcohol abuse may play a more salient role in the expression of coercive juvenile sexual coercion than previously hypothesized.

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Johnson, G.M., Knight, R.A. Developmental Antecedents of Sexual Coercion in Juvenile Sexual Offenders. Sex Abuse 12, 165–178 (2000). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1009546308248

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