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Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback

, Volume 25, Issue 1, pp 1–12 | Cite as

Effect of Sahaja Yoga Meditation on Auditory Evoked Potentials (AEP) and Visual Contrast Sensitivity (VCS) in Epileptics

  • U. Panjwani
  • W. Selvamurthy
  • S. H. Singh
  • H. L. Gupta
  • S. Mukhopadhyay
  • L. Thakur
Article

Abstract

The effect of Sahaja yoga meditation on 32 patients with primary idiopathic epilepsy on regular and maintained antiepileptic medication was studied. The patients were randomly divided into 3 groups: group I practiced Sahaja Yoga meditation twice daily for 6 months under proper guidance; group II practiced postural exercises mimicking the meditation for the same duration; and group III was the control group. Visual Contrast Sensitivity (VCS), Auditory Evoked Potentials (AEP), Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potentials (BAEP), and Mid Latency Responses (MLR) were recorded initially (0 month) and at 3 and 6 months for each group. There was a significant improvement in VCS following meditation practice in group I participants. Na, the first prominent negative peak of MLR and Pa, the positive peak following Na did not register changes in latency. The Na-Pa amplitude of MLR also showed a significant increase. There were no significant changes in the absolute and interpeak latencies of BAEP. The reduced level of stress following meditation practice may make patients more responsive to specific stimuli. Sahaja Yoga meditation appears to bring about changes in some of the electrophysiological responses studied in epileptic patients.

epilepsy meditation visual contrast sensitivity auditory evoked potentials 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • U. Panjwani
    • 1
    • 2
  • W. Selvamurthy
    • 1
  • S. H. Singh
    • 1
  • H. L. Gupta
    • 1
  • S. Mukhopadhyay
    • 1
  • L. Thakur
    • 1
  1. 1.Defence Institute of Physiology and Allied SciencesDelhi-India
  2. 2.Defence Institute of Physiology and Allied SciencesDelhi-India

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