Journal of Genetic Counseling

, Volume 9, Issue 5, pp 379–390 | Cite as

Supervision for Practicing Genetic Counselors: An Overview of Models

  • Annette L. Kennedy
Article

Abstract

Supervision has traditionally been a concept that refers primarilyto a means by which to train genetic counseling students. However, supervision—redefined—can afford anextraordinary opportunity for practicing genetic counselors to regularly update and enhancetheir counseling skills. This paper provides a new definition of supervision for experiencedgenetic counselors and discusses the process and advantages of different types ofsupervision. The leader-led peer supervision group will be highlighted as especiallyamenable to the needs of genetic counselors for a collegial forum in which to discuss thepsychosocial components of their work. Immediately following, in a separate paper, will bea description of a currently ongoing supervision group for practicing genetic counselors.

supervision supervision group genetic counseling 

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Copyright information

© National Society of Genetic Counselors, Inc. 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Annette L. Kennedy
    • 1
  1. 1.Lexington

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