Journal of Science Teacher Education

, Volume 11, Issue 2, pp 155–172 | Cite as

An Interpretive Study of a Teacher's Evolving Practice of Elementary School Science

  • Anjana G. Arora
  • Elizabeth Kean
  • Joan L. Anthony
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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anjana G. Arora
    • 1
  • Elizabeth Kean
    • 2
  • Joan L. Anthony
    • 3
  1. 1.School of EducationNorthern Kentucky UniversityHighland HeightsUSA
  2. 2.Department of Teacher EducationCalifornia State University SacramentoSacramentoUSA
  3. 3.Hillrise Elementary SchoolElkhornUSA

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