Quality of life of stroke survivors

Abstract

Adaptation to stroke requires complex, long-term change in stroke survivors' lives. This study aimed at identifying those factors that influence quality of life (QOL) of geriatric stroke survivors 1–3 years post-discharge. The objectives were: to describe the overall quality of life of stroke survivors; to examine the relationships between sociodemographic variables, neurological variables, functional status, social support, perceived health status, depression, and overall QOL; and to determine the best predictors of QOL. Data were collected on 50 stroke survivors using a cross-sectional design and standardized questionnaires, including the Quality of Life Index, the Functional Independence Measure, the Social Support Inventory for Stroke Survivors and the Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. The overall quality of life of the study participants was low. The most important predictors of QOL were depression, marital status, quality of social support, and functional status. Depression was the strongest predictor of QOL. By employing a multi-dimensional perspective, this study confirmed that adaptation to stroke involves much more than physical function. Thus, rehabilitation programs for this group would be more effective if they are based upon a holistic approach.

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Kim, P., Warren, S., Madill, H. et al. Quality of life of stroke survivors. Qual Life Res 8, 293–301 (1999). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1008927431300

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  • Quality of Life
  • Rehabilitation
  • Social Support
  • Stroke