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Violent Crime in the Urban Community: A Comparison of Stockholm and Basel

Abstract

In this article the authors present some preliminary findings from a comparative study of police recorded violent crimes in Stockholm and Basel. They present the first results from a comparative analysis of the situational context, the ecology of crime, and of offender residences in these cities. There is impressive evidence of basic similarities in the situational context of violent crime and the residential distribution of violent offenders. Yet there are also significant differences, some of which may have interesting implications for crime prevention. Firstly, violent crime seems to be more highly concentrated during weekend nights in Stockholm than in Basel. Secondly, they find evidence that the presence of weapons in a community increases the risk of more serious outcomes of violent events. Efforts to reduce the availability of weapons may thus have significant effects on the outcomes of violence, but not necessarily on its frequency. Thirdly, they show that offenders in both cities are highly concentrated in socially disorganised communities with few economic and social resources.

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Eisner, M., Wikström, PO. Violent Crime in the Urban Community: A Comparison of Stockholm and Basel. European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research 7, 427–442 (1999). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1008782232545

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1008782232545

  • comparative research
  • crime statistics
  • neighbourhood
  • statistical analysis
  • violent crime
  • weapons