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Signal Transduction in Resistance to Plant Viruses

Abstract

Salicylic acid is part of a signal transduction pathway that induces resistance to viruses, bacteria and fungi. In tobacco and Arabidopsis the defensive signal transduction pathway branches downstream of salicylic acid. One branch induces PR-1 proteins and resistance to bacteria and fungi, while the other triggers induction of resistance to RNA and DNA viruses. This virus-specific branch can be activated using antimycin A and cyanide, or inhibited with salicylhydroxamic acid, suggesting a role for alternative oxidase in resistance to viruses. The virus-specific defensive pathway activates multiple resistance mechanisms. In tobacco, salicylic acid induces resistance to systemic movement of cucumber mosaic virus but has no effect on its replication or cell-to-cell movement. However, in the case of tobacco mosaic virus in tobacco, salicylic acid appears to induce interference with the synthesis of viral RNA.

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Correspondence to Davinder P. Singh.

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Murphy, A.M., Gilliland, A., Eng Wong, C. et al. Signal Transduction in Resistance to Plant Viruses. European Journal of Plant Pathology 107, 121–128 (2001). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1008732123834

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1008732123834

  • acquired resistance
  • hypersensitive response
  • induced resistance
  • NPR1
  • plant defense
  • salicylic acid