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Science & Education

, Volume 6, Issue 4, pp 417–429 | Cite as

Developing a Graduate Level Science Education Course on the Nature of Science

  • David C. Eichinger
  • Sandra K. Abell
  • Zoubeida R. Dagher
Article

Abstract

The purpose of this report is to outline our experiences designing and teaching a course on the nature of science to science education graduate students. By addressing questions related to the creation of a new university course, the design of the course syllabus, and the transformation of the syllabus into instruction, we hope to make our craft knowledge more accessible to others who create such courses.

Keywords

Science Education Graduate Student Education Graduate Graduate Level Craft Knowledge 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • David C. Eichinger
    • 1
  • Sandra K. Abell
    • 1
  • Zoubeida R. Dagher
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Curriculum & InstructionPurdue UniversityWest LafayetteUSA
  2. 2.Department of Educational DevelopmentUniversity of DelawareNewarkUSA

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