Chemical characterisation of the released polysaccharide from the cyanobacterium Aphanothece halophytica GR02

Abstract

The released polysaccharide from the halophilic cyanobacterium Aphanothece halophytica GR02 was separated into two main fractions byanion-exchange chromatography. The major fraction consisted of glucose,fucose, mannose, arabinose and glucuronic acid. Judging from thechromatography on Sepharose 2B, the major fraction was not furtherfractionated, and its apparent molecular weight was above 2.0 × 106 Da.The minor fraction consisted of rhamnose, mannose, fucose,glucose, galactose and glucuronic acid, with traces of arabinose.Methylation and GC-MS spectrometry analyses of the major fractionrevealed the presence of 1-linked glucose, 1,3-linked glucose, 1,3-linkedfucose, 1,4-linked fucose, 1,3-linked arabinose, 1,2,4-linked mannose,1,3,6-linked mannose, 1-linked glucuronic acid and 1,3-linked glucuronicacid residues. The major fraction was thought to originate from capsularpolysaccharide. The released polysaccharides, obtained from cultures atdifferent age of culture, showed no striking variations in themonosaccharide composition and the relative proportions of themonosaccharides. However, the proportions of galactose and rhamnose inthe released polysaccharides, obtained from cultures under different salinity,were significantly different. The released polysaccharide also exhibitedgelling properties and strong affinity for metal ions.

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Li, P., Liu, Z. & Xu, R. Chemical characterisation of the released polysaccharide from the cyanobacterium Aphanothece halophytica GR02. Journal of Applied Phycology 13, 71–77 (2001). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1008109501066

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  • Aphanothece halophytica
  • released polysaccharide
  • purification
  • monosaccharide composition
  • structural characterisation
  • capsular polysaccharide
  • metal ions