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Anti-Herpes Simplex Virus substances produced by the marine green alga, Dunaliella primolecta

Abstract

Among 106 microalgae tested, the cytopathic effect (CPE) upon Vero cells of herpes simplex virus, Type 1 (HSV-1) was inhibited by four methanol extracts of Dunaliella bioculata C-523, D. primolecta C-525, Lyngbya sp. M-9 and Lyngbya aerugineo-coerulea M-12. The green alga, D. primolecta, had the highest anti HSV-1 activity, since 10 μg mL-1 of extract from this alga completely inhibited the CPE. This activity was similar to that of acyclovir at the same concentration. We compared anti-viral activities against adeno virus, herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2), Japanese Encephalitis and Polio viruses. Only the CPE of HSV-2 was inhibited. Thus, the factor was specific against HSV. The antiviral activity was apparently excited during HSV adsorption and invasion of the cells. We optimized the conditions for anti HSV-1 activity by prolonging the exposure of HSV-1 to the extract. After 2 h, the CPE of even a high titer of HSV-1 (106 TCID50/0.1 mL) was completely inactivated. By use of various chromatographic techniques, three green substances having anti-HSV activity were purified from the algal mass of D. primolecta, and 5 μg mL-1 of this purified substances completely inhibited the CPE. From the analysis of NMR and MS, the chemical structures of the active substances were identified as pheophorbide-like compounds.

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Ohta, S., Ono, F., Shiomi, Y. et al. Anti-Herpes Simplex Virus substances produced by the marine green alga, Dunaliella primolecta. Journal of Applied Phycology 10, 349–356 (1998). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1008065226194

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1008065226194

  • algae
  • Anti-HSV substance
  • Dunaliella
  • Lyngbya sp.
  • microalgae
  • anti-virus
  • Herpes simplex virus
  • commercial microorganisms