Contemporary Family Therapy

, Volume 22, Issue 4, pp 387–406 | Cite as

Family Therapy in India: A New Profession in an Ancient Land?

  • David K. Carson
  • Aparajita Chowdhury

Abstract

This paper examines the need for family therapy in India and its evolution as an integrated academic discipline and widespread form of clinical practice. Included is a discussion of the numerous factors placing Indian families at risk today, both common and more serious child, marital, and family difficulties, the current status of mental health services and minimal emphasis on family-based treatment, and the potential benefits of family therapy to such a radically diverse and rapidly changing society. Targets of and settings for family therapy training are highlighted, and a brief outline of a training-the-trainer approach is provided.

India family therapy mental health 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • David K. Carson
    • 1
  • Aparajita Chowdhury
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Family and Consumer SciencesUniversity of WyomingLaramie
  2. 2.Post Graduate Department of Home ScienceBerhampur UniversityBerhampur (Bhanja Bihar), OrissaIndia

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