Advertisement

Journal of Traumatic Stress

, Volume 14, Issue 1, pp 135–147 | Cite as

Validation of a Self-Report Measure of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in a Sample of College-Age Women

  • Melissa R. Cross
  • Thomas R. McCanne
Article

Abstract

The Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Interview (PTSD-I; Watson, C. G., Juba, M., Manifold, V., Kucala, T., & Anderson, E. D., 1991) was adapted into a self-report questionnaire, the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Questionnaire (PTSD-Q), which was validated against the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-IV) PTSD module (First, Spitzer, Gibbon, & Williams, 1995), using a sample of 76 college-age women who were not seeking help for psychological problems. The women completed the PTSD-Q and were later interviewed with the SCID-IV PTSD module. Use of a Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analysis indicated that a cut point of 60 on the PTSD-Q provided the optimal diagnostic efficiency relative to the SCID-IV diagnosis. Using a cut point of 60 on the PTSD-Q resulted in a sensitivity of .81 and a specificity of .82, relative to SCID-IV diagnoses. The PTSD-Q may be a useful screening measure to identify individuals who are not seeking help but who have PTSD.

posttraumatic stress disorder diagnosis self-report measures SCID-IV ROC curve analysis PTSD-Q 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. American Psychiatric Association. (1980). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (3rd ed.). Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  2. American Psychiatric Association. (1987). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (3rd ed. revised). Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  3. American Psychiatric Association. (1994). Diagnostic and statistical manul of mental disorders (4th ed.). Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  4. Blanchard, E. B., Wittrock, D., Kolb, L. C., & Gerardi, R. J. (1988). Cross-validation of a Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Invetory (MMPI) subscale for the assessment of combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, 10, 33–38.Google Scholar
  5. Davidson, J. R., Book, S.W., Colket, J. T., Tulper, L. A., Roth, S., David, D., Hertzberg, M., Mellman, T., Beckham, J. C., Smith, R. D., Davison, R. M., Katz, R., & Feldman, M. E. (1997). Assessment of a new self-rating scale for post-traumatic stress disorder. Psychological Medicine, 27, 153–160.Google Scholar
  6. Engdahl, B. E., Eberly, R. E., & Blake, J. D. (1996). Assessment of posttraumatic stress disorder in World War II venterans. Psychological Assessment, 8, 445–449.Google Scholar
  7. First, M., Spitzer, R. L., Gibbon, M., & Williams, J. B. (1995). Structured Clinical Interview for DSMIV Axis I Disorders—Non-Patient Edition. Biometrics Research Department, NY: New York State Psychiatric Institute.Google Scholar
  8. Foa, E. B., Cashman, L., Jaycox, L., & Perry, K. (1997). The validation of a self-report measure of posttraumatic stress disorder: The Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale. Psychological Assessment, 9, 445–451.Google Scholar
  9. Foa, E. B., Riggs, D. S., Dancu, C. V., Rothbaum, B. O. (1993). Reliability and validity of a brief instrument for assessing post-traumatic stress disorder. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 6, 459–473.Google Scholar
  10. Gaston, L., Brunet, A., Koszycki, D., & Bradwejn, J. (1996). MMPI profiles of acute and chronic PTSD in a civilian sample. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 9, 817–832.Google Scholar
  11. Gold, J. W., & Cardena, E. (1998). Convergent validity of three posttraumatic symptoms inventories among adult sexual abuse survivors. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 11, 173–180.Google Scholar
  12. Gregg, G. R., & Parks, E. D. (1995). Selected Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Scales for identifying women with a history of sexual abuse. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 183, 53–56.Google Scholar
  13. Hammarberg, M. (1992). Penn Inventory for posttraumatic stress disorder: Psychometric Properties. Psychological Assessment, 4, 67–76.Google Scholar
  14. Horowitz, M. J., Wilner, N., & Alvarez, W. (1979). Impact of Event Scale: A measure of subjective stress. Psychosomatic Medicine, 41, 209–218.Google Scholar
  15. Keane, T. M., Caddell, J. M., & Taylor, K. L. (1988). Mississippi scale for combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder: Three studies in reliability and validity. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 56, 85–90.Google Scholar
  16. Keane, T. M., Malloy, P., & Fairbank, J. (1984). The empirical development of an MMPI subscale for the assessment of combat-related post-traumatic stress disorders. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 52, 888–891.Google Scholar
  17. King, L. A., King, D. W., Leskin, G., & Foy, D. (1995). The Los Angeles Symptom Checklist: A self-report measure of posttraumatic stress disorder. Assessment, 2, 1–17.Google Scholar
  18. Koretzky, M. B., & Peck, A. H. (1990). Validation and cross-validation of the PTSD subscale of the MMPI with civilian trauma victims. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 46, 296–300.Google Scholar
  19. Kraemer, H. C. (1992). Evaluating medical tests: Objective and quantitative guidelines. New York: Sage Publications.Google Scholar
  20. Kulka, R. A., Schlenger, W. E., Fairbank, J. A., Hough, R. L., Jordan, B. K., Marmar, C. R., & Weiss, D. S. (1988). National Vietnam Veterans Readjustment Study (NVVRS): Description, current status, and initial PTSD prevlance estimates. Research Triangle Park, NC: Research Triangle Park Institute.Google Scholar
  21. McCaffrey, R. J., Hickling, E. J., & Marrazo, M. J. (1989). Civilian-related post-traumatic stress disorder: Assessment-related issues. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 45, 72–76.Google Scholar
  22. McFall, M. E., Smith, D. E., Mackay, P. W., & Tarver, D. J. (1990). Reliability and validity of the Mississippi Scale for combat-related PTSD. Psychological Assessment, 2, 114–121.Google Scholar
  23. Neal, L. A., Busuttil, W., Rollins, J., Herepath, R., Strike, P., & Tumbull, G. (1994). Convergent validity of measures of post-traumatic stress disorder in a mixed military and civilian population. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 7, 447–455.Google Scholar
  24. Query, W. T., Megran, J., & McDonald, G. (1986). Applying posttraumatic stress disorder MMPI subscale to World War II POW veterans. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 42, 315–317.Google Scholar
  25. Resnick, H. S., Kilpatrick, D. G., Dansky, B. S., Saunders, B. E., & Best, C. L. (1993). Prevalence of civilian trauma and posttraumatic stress disorder in a representative national sample of women. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 61, 984–991.Google Scholar
  26. Robins, L. N., & Helzer, J. E. (1985). Diagnostic Interview Schedule (DIS) version III-R. St. Louis, MO: Department of Psychiatry, Washington University.Google Scholar
  27. Saunders, B. E., Arata, C. M., & Kilpatrick, D. G. (1990). Development of a crime-related posttraumatic stress disorder scale for women within the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 3, 439–448.Google Scholar
  28. Schlenger, W. E., & Kulka, R. A. (1987). Performance of the Fairbank-Keane MMPI scale and other self-report measures in identifying PTSD. Paper presented at the 95th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association, NY.Google Scholar
  29. Schlenger, W. E., & Kulka, R. A. (1989). PTSD scale development for the MMPI-2. Research Triangle Park, NC: Research Triangle Institute.Google Scholar
  30. Silver, S. M., & Salamone-Genovese, L. (1991). A study of the MMPI clinical and research scales for PTSD diagnostic utility. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 4, 533–548.Google Scholar
  31. Sinnett, E. R., Holen, M. C., & Albott, W. L. (1995). MMPI scores of female victims. Psychological Reports, 76, 139–144.Google Scholar
  32. Solomon, Z., Benbenishty, R., Neria, Y., Abramowitz, M., Ginzburg, K., & Ohry, A. (1993). Assessment of PTSD: Validation of the revised PTSD Inventory. Israel Journal of Psychiatry and Related Sciences, 30, 110–115.Google Scholar
  33. Vrana, S., & Lauterbach, D. (1996). Three studies on the reliability and validity of a self-report measure of posttraumatic stress disorder. Assessment, 3, 17–25.Google Scholar
  34. Watson, C. G., Juba, M., Manifold, V., Kucala, T., & Anderson, E. D. (1991). The PTSD Interview: Rationale, description, reliability, and concurrent validity of a DSM-III-based technique. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 47, 179–188.Google Scholar
  35. Watson, C. G., Kucala, T., & Manifold, V. (1986). A cross validation of the keane and Penk MMPI scales as measures of post-traumatic stress disorder. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 42, 727–732.Google Scholar
  36. Weiss, D. S., & Marmar, C. R. (1997). The Impact of Event Scale-Revised. In J. P. Wilson & T. M. Keane (Eds.), Assessing psychological trauma and PTSD (pp. 399–411). NewYork: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  37. Zlotnick, C., Davidson, J., Shea, M. T., & Pearlstein, T. (1996). Validation of the Davidson Trauma Scale in a sample of survivors of childhood sexual abuse. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 184, 255–257.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Melissa R. Cross
    • 1
  • Thomas R. McCanne
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyNorthern Illinois UniversityDeKalb

Personalised recommendations