Smart Recovery®: Addiction Recovery Support from a Cognitive-Behavioral Perspective

Abstract

Self Management And Recovery Training (SMART®), a free self-help discussion group that is largely a cognitive-behavioral extrapolation of research findings on treatment of addictive disorders, is described. Information regarding its organization and operation is provided, and predictions are made about its future development.

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Horvath, A.T. Smart Recovery®: Addiction Recovery Support from a Cognitive-Behavioral Perspective. Journal of Rational-Emotive & Cognitive-Behavior Therapy 18, 181–191 (2000). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1007831005098

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Keywords

  • Public Health
  • Research Finding
  • Future Development
  • Discussion Group
  • Addictive Disorder