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The Influence of Positive and Negative Affectivity on Attitude Change Toward Organizations

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Abstract

This study tests hypothesized differences in pre-post (product-harm) crisis attitude change toward an organization for positively and negatively oriented individuals. Contrary to theoretical predictions, there was not a strong differential attitude change between positively and negatively oriented individuals. The results suggest a possible boundary condition for the influence of positive and negative affectivity on attitude change. Two explanations are offered for these findings: (1) that the vividness of the situation might override affectivity and (2) that affectivity might not be a strong predictor of attitude change for nonpersonalized attitudes.

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Siomkos, G.J., Rao, S.S. & Narayanan, S. The Influence of Positive and Negative Affectivity on Attitude Change Toward Organizations. Journal of Business and Psychology 16, 151–161 (2001). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1007800124297

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