Journal of Insect Behavior

, Volume 13, Issue 1, pp 87–101 | Cite as

Brood Odor Discrimination Abilities in Hygienic Honey Bees (Apis mellifera L.) Using Proboscis Extension Reflex Conditioning

  • R. Masterman
  • B. H. Smith
  • M. Spivak
Article

Abstract

To understand the effect of abnormal brood odors on the initiation or control of hygienic behavior in honey bees, we employed the associative learning paradigm, proboscis extension reflex conditioning. Bees from two genetic lines(hygienic and non-hygienic) were able to discriminate between high concentrations of two floral odors equally well. Differential discrimination abilities were observed between the two lines when healthy and diseased brood odors were used, with the bees from the hygienic line discriminating between the pair of brood odors better than the non-hygienic bees. These results suggest that hygienic behavior in individual bees is associated with the bees' responses to olfactory stimuli emanating from diseased brood.

hygienic behavior discrimination conditioning honey bees Apis Mellifera olfaction 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Masterman
    • 1
  • B. H. Smith
    • 2
  • M. Spivak
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of EntomologyUniversity of MinnesotaSaint PaulU.S.A.
  2. 2.Department of EntomologyOhio State UniversityColumbusU.S.A.

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