Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal

, Volume 17, Issue 2, pp 115–140 | Cite as

How Runaway and Homeless Youth Navigate Troubled Waters: Personal Strengths and Resources

  • Elizabeth W. Lindsey
  • P. David Kurtz
  • Sara Jarvis
  • Nancy R. Williams
  • Larry Nackerud
Article

Abstract

Little attention has been paid to how runaway or homeless adolescents are able to make successful transitions into adulthood. This article reports on partial findings from an exploratory study of the research question, “How do formerly runaway and homeless adolescents navigate the troubled waters of leaving home, living in high-risk environments, and engaging in dangerous behaviors, to make successful developmental transitions into young adulthood?” This qualitative study involved interviews with 12 formerly runaway or homeless youth. Data were analyzed using the constant comparative method. This paper reports on findings related to the personal strengths and resources that enabled youth to make successful transitions: learning new attitudes and behaviors, personal attributes, and spirituality. Recommendations for program development and intervention with homeless or at-risk youth are discussed.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elizabeth W. Lindsey
    • 1
  • P. David Kurtz
    • 2
  • Sara Jarvis
    • 3
  • Nancy R. Williams
    • 2
  • Larry Nackerud
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Social WorkThe University of North Carolina at GreensboroGreensboro
  2. 2.School of Social WorkThe University of GeorgiaAthens
  3. 3.Southeastern Network of Youth & Family ServicesDurham

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