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Plant Molecular Biology Reporter

, Volume 15, Issue 3, pp 219–235 | Cite as

Transgenic Populus tremula: a step-by-step protocol for its Agrobacterium-mediated transformation

  • Tzvi Tzfira
  • Christian S. Jensen
  • Wangxia Wang
  • Amir Zuker
  • Basia Vinocur
  • Arie Altman
  • Alexander Vainstein
Article

Abstract

In recent years, Populus species have acquired an important place in basic and applied research of woody plants. The practical role of Populus species in world forestry and their importance to research as a woody-plant model have led to increasing interest in tissue-culture and molecular techniques, as well as the development of transformation procedures for this genus. A simple technical procedure is described here step-by-step, for the first time, as a routine method for transforming Populus tremula using a disarmed Agrobacterium tumefaciens hypervirulent strain. The procedure begins with the inoculation of stem explants with bacterial suspension, followed by a short period of co-cultivation on a highly regenerative medium. Transformed shoots are selected on regeneration medium containing antibiotics and the presence of the inserted target genes is checked using a rapid and efficient PCR test. Selected shoots are transferred to a rooting medium, under the same selection pressure, and propagated via stem cuttings. Selected plants can be hardened and transferred to the green-house within 4 months of inoculation. The method has proven efficient for several gene constructs, selection on Kan or Hyg, and three different Agrobacterium strains.

Agrobacterium Populus transformation 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tzvi Tzfira
    • 1
  • Christian S. Jensen
    • 2
  • Wangxia Wang
    • 1
  • Amir Zuker
    • 1
  • Basia Vinocur
    • 1
  • Arie Altman
    • 1
  • Alexander Vainstein
    • 1
  1. 1.The Otto Warburg Center for Biotechnology in AgricultureThe Hebrew University of JerusalemRehovotIsrael
  2. 2.The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural UniversityFrederiksbergDenmark

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