Gender and Job Status as Contextual Cues for the Interpretation of Facial Expression of Emotion

Abstract

Participants' interpretations of facial expressions of emotion and judgments made about the poser as a function of gender, job status, and facial expression were examined. Two hypotheses regarding interpretation of expression stress either facial expression alone or a combination of facial expression and social context. Gender and status of target were expected to influence ratings of emotion and personality characteristics. In a 2 × 2 × 3 between-subjects design, 246 participants (90% non-Hispanic Whites) read a vignette of a workplace interaction manipulating gender and job status of target and viewed a slide of the target displaying a facial expression of emotion. Measures of perceived emotion and ratings of personality characteristics produced main effects and interactions in support of the context-specific hypothesis: Gender and job status were significant influences on interpretation.

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Algoe, S.B., Buswell, B.N. & DeLamater, J.D. Gender and Job Status as Contextual Cues for the Interpretation of Facial Expression of Emotion. Sex Roles 42, 183–208 (2000). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1007087106159

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Keywords

  • Social Psychology
  • Significant Influence
  • Facial Expression
  • Social Context
  • Personality Characteristic