Breast Cancer Research and Treatment

, Volume 61, Issue 2, pp 145–150 | Cite as

Patients' understanding of their own disease and survival potential in patients with metastatic breast cancer

  • Hitoshi Okamura
  • Noboru Yamamoto
  • Toru Watanabe
  • Noriyuki Katsumata
  • Shigemitsu Takashima
  • Isamu Adachi
  • Akira Kugaya
  • Tatsuo Akechi
  • Yosuke Uchitomi

Abstract

Purpose: To investigate the effect of understanding their own disease by patients with metastatic breast cancer on their survival potential after being informed by their physician.

Patientsandmethods: Two hundred and fourteen women with metastatic breast cancer who participated in a multi-institutional, randomized phase III trial (Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG) Study 8808) were asked whether they understood their own disease after being given information about the clinical trial. They were classified into two groups on the basis of whether they understood or not. We estimated their survival after the time of registration and derived relative hazard ratios from Cox's proportional hazards model.

Results: There were 190 patients in the ‘better understanding’ group and 24 in the ‘poor understanding’ group. Median survival times after registration were 28.3 and 16.1 months, respectively. The ‘better understanding’ group showed a significant difference from the ‘poor understanding’ group (p=0.016). In multivariate regression analysis, patients who did not understand still showed poorer survival than those who understood (hazard ratio = 2.09; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16–3.78; p=0.014)

clinical trial informed consent metastatic breast cancer survival understanding 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hitoshi Okamura
    • 1
    • 2
  • Noboru Yamamoto
    • 3
    • 2
  • Toru Watanabe
    • 3
    • 2
  • Noriyuki Katsumata
    • 3
    • 2
  • Shigemitsu Takashima
    • 4
    • 2
  • Isamu Adachi
    • 3
    • 2
  • Akira Kugaya
    • 1
    • 2
  • Tatsuo Akechi
    • 5
  • Yosuke Uchitomi
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Psycho-Oncology DivisionNational Cancer Center Research Institute EastJapan
  2. 2.the Breast Cancer Study Groupthe Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG)Japan
  3. 3.Department of Medical OncologyNational Cancer Center HospitalJapan
  4. 4.Department of SurgeryNational Shikoku Cancer Center HospitalJapan
  5. 5.Psychiatry DivisionNational Cancer Center HospitalJapan

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