Teaching On-Task and On-Schedule Behaviors to High-Functioning Children with Autism Via Picture Activity Schedules

Abstract

The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the effectiveness of a two-component teaching package (graduated guidance and visual activity schedules) in teaching young students with autism to increase on-task and on-schedule behavior. Four children enrolled in a resource-based classroom in a public elementary school served as participants. An A—B—A—B withdrawal design was used to evaluate the effectiveness of a picture activity schedule on the percentage of intervals scored as on-task and on-schedule. Generalization measures were taken on the percentage of intervals scored as on-task and on-schedule with novel activities. The results of the investigation indicate that (a) student performance rose to criterion levels upon introduction of the graduated guidance procedure, (b) student performance maintained when the picture activity book was available (Book Only) and dropped when the picture activity book was not available (No Book), and (c) student performance generalized to novel activities. The implications of these findings show the importance for future development and use of visual activity schedules to promote the independent functioning of students with autism spectrum disorders in their least restrictive environments.

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Bryan, L.C., Gast, D.L. Teaching On-Task and On-Schedule Behaviors to High-Functioning Children with Autism Via Picture Activity Schedules. J Autism Dev Disord 30, 553–567 (2000). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1005687310346

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  • Autism
  • graduated guidance procedure
  • picture activity book