Tropical Animal Health and Production

, Volume 30, Issue 2, pp 107–114 | Cite as

Prevalence and infection pattern of Trypanosoma evansi in camels in mid-eastern Sudan

  • E.A. Elamin
  • M.O.A. El Bashir
  • E.M.A. Saeed

Abstract

The antigen detection enzyme immunoassay (AgELISA) in conjunction with parasitological examination of blood were used to study the enzootic situation of cameline trypanosomiasis in mid-Eastern Sudan. A one year survey showed that the infection is endemic among pastoral camels with a prevalence of 5.4% based on parasitological examination and 31.3% based on AgELISA. The infection rate was higher during the dry period (November to May) than the wet season. Young camels had a much lower infection rate as detected by parasitological techniques, but not with AgELISA. A lower prevalence of infection was detected by buffy coat technique (BCT) in herds of camels raised by nomads compared with those kept by agropastoralists and in camels located in the southern districts of mid-Eastern Sudan.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • E.A. Elamin
    • 1
  • M.O.A. El Bashir
    • 1
  • E.M.A. Saeed
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary ScienceUniversity of KhartoumKhartoum NorthSudan
  2. 2.Department of Microbiology and ParasitologyCollege of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Resources, King Faisal UniversityAl-AhsaSaudi Arabia.

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