Secretion of phytase from the roots of several plant species under phosphorus-deficient conditions

Abstract

Phosphorus (P) deficiency increased the secretion of phytases from roots of various plant species. The secretory phytases were collected with a dialysis membrane tube for 24 hours from roots of sixteen plant species grown with low or adequate supply of P in nutrient solutions. The activity of not only secretory phytase, but also acid phosphatase, increased with the low P treatment in all of the plant species examined. Secretion of phytase by the roots under P-deficient conditions was highest in Brachiaria decumbens CIAT 606, Stylosanthes guianensis CIAT 184 and tomato, moderate in Brachiaria brizantha CIAT6780, Stylosanthes guianensis CIAT 2950, alfalfa, white clover and orchard grass, and lowest in Andropgon gayanus CIAT 621, Stylosanthes capitata CIAT 10280, upland rice, timothy, redtop, alsike clover, red clover and white lupin plants. An immunoreactive protein band that reacted with a polyclonal antibody raised against wheat bran phytase, corresponding to molecular weight 35–40 kD, could be detected in seven of the species tested. These results indicate that the secretory phytase may provide an efficient mechanism for certain plants to utilize inositol hexaphosphate in soil.

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Correspondence to Mitsuru Osaki.

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Li, M., Osaki, M., Madhusudana Rao, I. et al. Secretion of phytase from the roots of several plant species under phosphorus-deficient conditions. Plant and Soil 195, 161–169 (1997). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1004264002524

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  • anti-phytase IgG
  • phosphorus deficiency
  • phytic acid
  • secretory acid phosphatase
  • secretory phytase