Skip to main content

Regional variation in Brassica nigra and other weedy crucifers for disease reaction to Alternaria brassicicola and Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris

Abstract

For Brassica crop breeders, weedy crucifers are potential sources of disease resistance and other useful traits. However, few species have been evaluated or are well represented in germplasm collections. In this study, we evaluated 24 Eurasian crucifer species for disease reaction to North American isolates of the crop pathogens A. brassicicola and X. campestris pv. campestris. The test array comprised 190 entries (genebank accessions and weed populations), including 108 B. nigra entries from four geographic regions and 34 entries of Camelina sativa. Disease reaction was highly variable between species and within some species. Reaction to A. brassicicola was variable between entries of C. sativa, a species reported as highly resistant to Alternaria pathogens. In B. nigra, disease reaction was variable between geographic regions and between entries within some regions. Most of the B. nigra entries rated as disease resistant were weed populations from North America, but disease reaction was not related to the geographic distance between these populations. In summary, disease reaction to two crop pathogens was variable in crucifer weed taxa, including species considered to contain little genetic variation. We identified entries with promising levels of disease resistance and highlighted the potential value of weedy crucifer genetic resources.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

References

  1. Bansal, V.K., G. Séguin-Swartz, G.F.W. Rakow & G.A. Petrie, 1990. Reaction of Brassica species to infection by Alternaria brassicae. Can J Plant Sci 70: 1159–1162.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  2. Conn, K.L., J.P. Tewari & J.S. Dahiya, 1988. Resistance to Alternaria brassicae and phytoalexin-elicitation in rapeseed and other crucifers. Plant Sci 56: 21–25.

    Article  CAS  Google Scholar 

  3. Dickson, M.H. & J.E. Hunter, 1987. Inheritance of resistance in cabbage seedlings to black rot. HortScience 22: 108–109.

    Google Scholar 

  4. Dinoor, A., 1975. Evaluation of sources of disease resistance. In: O.H. Frankel & J.G. Hawkes (Eds), Crop Genetic Resources for Today and Tomorrow, pp. 201–210. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.

    Google Scholar 

  5. Gómez-Campo, C., 1978. Studies on Cruciferae: 3. Chorological notes. Anal Inst Bot Cavanilles 34: 485–496.

    Google Scholar 

  6. Guo, H., M.H. Dickson & J.E. Hunter, 1991. Brassica napus sources of resistance to black rot in crucifers and inheritance of resistance. HortScience 26: 1545–1547.

    Google Scholar 

  7. Hansen, L.H & E.D. Earle, 1995. Transfer of resistance to Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris L. by protoplast fusion. Theor Appl Genet 91: 1293–1300.

    Article  CAS  Google Scholar 

  8. Harlan, J.R., 1984. Evaluation of wild relatives of crop plants. In: J.H.W. Holden & J.T. Williams (Eds), Crop Genetic Resources: Conservation and Evaluation, pp. 212–222. Allen and Unwin, London.

    Google Scholar 

  9. Hunter, J.E, M.H. Dickson & J.W. Ludwig, 1987. Source of resistance to black rot of cabbage expressed in seedlings and adult plants. Plant Dis 71: 263–266.

    Google Scholar 

  10. Johnson, H.B., 1975. Plant pubescence: an ecological perspective Bot Rev 41: 233–258.

    Google Scholar 

  11. King, S.R., 1994. Screening, selection, and genetics of resistance to Alternaria diseases in Brassica oleracea. Ph.D. thesis, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York (Diss Abstr Int 55/07-B: 2471).

    Google Scholar 

  12. Mingochi, D.S. & A. Jensen, 1988. Reaction of rape and Ethiopian mustard selections to blackrot and turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) in Zambia. Acta Hortic 218: 289–291.

    Google Scholar 

  13. Nanda Kumar, P.B.A., V. Dushenkov, B.D. Ensley & I. Raskin, 1995. The use of crop brassicas in phytoextraction: a subset of phytoremediation to remove toxic metals from soils. Proc 9th Internatl Rapeseed Congr 3: 753–756.

    Google Scholar 

  14. Novak, S.J., R.N Mack & P.S. Soltis, 1993. Genetic variation in Bromus tectorum (Poaceae): introduction dynamics in North America. Can J Bot 71: 1441–1448.

    Google Scholar 

  15. Prakash, S. & K. Hinata, 1980. Taxonomy, cytogenetics and origin of crop brassicas, a review. Opera Bot 55: 1–57.

    Google Scholar 

  16. Robbins, W.W., 1940. Alien plants growing without cultivation in California. Univ Calif Agric Exp Stn Bull 637.

  17. SAS Institute, 1989. Statistical Analysis Systems Proprietary Software Release 6.08. SAS Institute, Cary, North Carolina.

    Google Scholar 

  18. Sauer, J.D., 1993. Historical Geography of Crop Plants: a Select Roster. CRC Press, Boca Raton, Florida.

    Google Scholar 

  19. Warwick, S.I. & A. Francis, 1994. Guide to the Wild Germplasm of Brassica and Allied Crops. Part 5. Life history and geographical data for wild species in the tribe Brassiceae (Cruciferae). Agric Can Res Branch Tech Bull 1994–2E.

  20. Watson, A.G. & K.F Baker, 1969. Possible gene centers for resistance in the genus Brassica to Plasmodiophora brassicae. Econ Bot 23: 245–252.

    Google Scholar 

  21. Westman, A.L., 1998. Molecular marker variation and disease reaction to Alternaria brassicicola and Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris in Brassica nigra and other crucifer species. Ph.D. thesis, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York.

    Google Scholar 

  22. White, G.A. & H.E. Waterworth, 1996. International exchange of crop germplasm. HortScience 31: 315–321.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Westman, A.L., Kresovich, S. & Dickson, M.H. Regional variation in Brassica nigra and other weedy crucifers for disease reaction to Alternaria brassicicola and Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris. Euphytica 106, 253–259 (1999). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1003544025146

Download citation

  • black rot
  • crop relatives
  • geographic variation
  • introduced weeds
  • leaf spot
  • mustard