Education for All: Policy Lessons from High-Achieving Countries

Abstract

This paper draws upon case studies of countries which universalised primary education early in their development process and rapidly increased secondary enrolments thereafter. It examines the common elements of social, and specifically, education policy among these high achievers, and also evaluates the policy lessons for other developing countries from the experience of these countries. The supply and demand-side factors which help in explaining this success are compared with the situation prevailing in the rest of the developing world.

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Mehrotra, S. Education for All: Policy Lessons from High-Achieving Countries. International Review of Education 44, 461–484 (1998). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1003433029696

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Keywords

  • Development Process
  • Primary Education
  • Education Policy
  • Common Element
  • High Achiever