The Contemporary Women's Movement and Women's Education in India

Abstract

The contemporary women's movement in India (1975–present) has played an important role in bringing gender issues to the forefront of development planning and defining feminist politics. This paper examines how this movement has addressed the issue of women's education. The first section highlights contributions of the social reformist movement in the 19th century and the nationalist movement in promoting women's education. The role of the contemporary women's movement in changing school curricula is examined in the second section, followed by discussion on how women's studies has contributed to redefining knowledge. The fourth section discusses women's empowerment and education from the perspective of the women's movement. The article concludes by highlighting challenges facing the women's movement in promoting women's education for equality and empowerment.

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Patel, I. The Contemporary Women's Movement and Women's Education in India. International Review of Education 44, 155–175 (1998). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1003125808644

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Keywords

  • 19th Century
  • School Curriculum
  • Fourth Section
  • Gender Issue
  • Feminist Politics