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Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review

, Volume 3, Issue 4, pp 243–267 | Cite as

The Efficacy, Safety, and Practicality of Treatments for Adolescents with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

  • Bradley H. Smith
  • Daniel A. Waschbusch
  • Michael T. Willoughby
  • Steven Evans
Article

Abstract

Studies examining interventions for adolescents diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) were reviewed to evaluate their efficacy. These efficacy findings were supplemented with a preliminary system for judging safety and practicality. Results suggest that the stimulant drug methylphenidate (MPH) is safe and well-established empirically, but has some problems with inconvenience and noncompliance. Preliminary research supports the efficacy, safety, and practicality of some psychotherapeutic interventions, including behavioral classroom interventions, note-taking training, and family therapy. Treatment with tricyclic antidepressants was judged to have minimal empirical support and debatable safety. Very little is known about long-term effectiveness of treatments, long-term compliance, or multimodal treatments for adolescents such as stimulants plus behavior therapy.

ADHD adolescent hyperactive inattentive stimulant teen treatment 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bradley H. Smith
    • 1
  • Daniel A. Waschbusch
    • 2
  • Michael T. Willoughby
    • 3
  • Steven Evans
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of South CarolinaUSA
  2. 2.Dalhouse UniversityUSA
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyUniversity of North CarolinaUSA
  4. 4.Department of PsychologyJames Madison UniversityUSA

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