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Journal of Materials Science

, Volume 38, Issue 21, pp 4307–4317 | Cite as

Development of a selective gas sensor utilizing a perm-selective zeolite membrane

  • W. L. Rauch
  • M. Liu
Article

Abstract

Reported here is a novel sensor that utilizes a zeolite film to selectively limit gas exposure of the sensing surface. A unique amperometric sensor design based on a non-porous mixed conducting sensing electrode enables the formation of a continuous zeolite film covering the entire sensor surface. The sensor was tested in a variety of oxygen containing gases. The sensor without a zeolite film responded strongly to both oxygen and carbon dioxide at a bias of 1.8 V. In contrast, the sensor coated with a zeolite film showed a discernable, but diminished response to oxygen, and a more marked drop in response to CO2 indicating that the diffusion of oxygen through the zeolite film is preferential to that of CO2. The response of the zeolite coated sensor to a mixture of oxygen and carbon dioxide gases is attributed primarily to the oxygen content. Expanding this concept using a variety of different zeolite structures covering an array of sensors, complete analyses of complex gaseous mixtures could be performed in a very small device.

Keywords

Zeolite Sensor Surface Small Device Sensor Design Zeolite Structure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Materials Science and EngineeringGeorgia Institute of TechnologyAtlantaUSA

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