Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 28, Issue 6, pp 567–571 | Cite as

Brief Report: The Association of Neurofibromatosis Type 1 and Autism

  • P. Gail Williams
  • Joseph H. Hersh
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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Gail Williams
    • 1
  • Joseph H. Hersh
    • 1
  1. 1.Child Evaluation CenterUniversity of Louisville School of MedicineLouisville

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