International Journal of Primatology

, Volume 24, Issue 2, pp 383–388 | Cite as

Nonhuman Primates in the Namdapha National Park, Arunachal Pradesh, India

  • Dilip Chetry
  • Rekha Medhi
  • Jihosuo Biswas
  • Debojit Das
  • P. C. Bhattacharjee
Article

Abstract

Namdapha National Park and Tiger Reserve in the Changlang District of Arunachal Pradesh in northeastern India are rich in biodiversity. The dense evergreen forest of the park with high canopy coverage supports a variety of fauna including primates. In February, 2002, we surveyed the primates in Namdapha National Park to assess their status. We directly sighted, 5 species of diurnal primates, and secondary information shows the presence of stump-tailed macaques and slow lories. We encountered 10 groups of hoolock gibbons (33 individuals), 9 troops of capped langurs (61 individuals), 15 groups of Assam macaques (209 individuals), 6 groups of rhesus macaques (74 individuals) and one unidentified group of macaques (≤15 individuals). Hunting, rather than habitat destruction, is the chief potential threat for primates in the park.

Namdapha National Park survey primate and hunting 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dilip Chetry
    • 1
    • 2
  • Rekha Medhi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jihosuo Biswas
    • 1
    • 2
  • Debojit Das
    • 2
  • P. C. Bhattacharjee
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Animal Ecology and Wildlife Biology Lab, Department of ZoologyGauhati UniversityGuwahatiIndia.
  2. 2.Primate Research CentreNortheast India, Guwahati, AssamIndia

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