Sex Roles

, Volume 48, Issue 7–8, pp 305–315

Mothers, Fathers, Gender Role, and Time Parents Spend with Their Children

  • Kimberly Renk
  • Rex Roberts
  • Angela Roddenberry
  • Mary Luick
  • Sarah Hillhouse
  • Cricket Meehan
  • Arazais Oliveros
  • Vicky Phares
Article

Abstract

To examine the relationships among the sex of the parent, gender role, and the time parents spend with their children, 272 parents completed the Bem Sex-Role Inventory, a questionnaire about the time spent with their children, and a demographics questionnaire. Analyses indicated that neither the sex of the parent nor gender role was predictive of the amount of time parents were spending in direct interaction with or being accessible to their children. The sex of the parent, qualified by earning status, was predictive of the level of responsibility parents had for child-related activities. Further, the sex of the parent, qualified by femininity, was predictive of parental satisfaction with level of child-related responsibilities. These results emphasize the importance of examining parental characteristics in relation to the time parents spend with their children and their levels of responsibility for child-related activities.

mothers fathers gender role parenting 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kimberly Renk
    • 1
  • Rex Roberts
    • 1
  • Angela Roddenberry
    • 1
  • Mary Luick
    • 1
  • Sarah Hillhouse
    • 1
  • Cricket Meehan
    • 1
  • Arazais Oliveros
    • 1
  • Vicky Phares
    • 2
  1. 1.University of Central FloridaOrlando
  2. 2.University of South FloridaTampa

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