Journal of Primary Prevention

, Volume 19, Issue 1, pp 3–30 | Cite as

Comprehensive Quality Programming and Accountability: Eight Essential Strategies for Implementing Successful Prevention Programs

  • Abraham Wandersman
  • Erin Morrissey
  • Katrina Davino
  • Diana Seybolt
  • Cindy Crusto
  • Maury Nation
  • Robert Goodman
  • Pamela Imm
Article

Abstract

This article presents strategies that can be used to improve the state of the practice of prevention programs. Although these strategies have broad application to all forms of prevention and intervention programs, this article focuses on the application of such strategies to youth and family prevention programs. If positive changes in the lives of the youth and families in our communities are to be realized, it is imperative that effective and quality prevention programs reach these populations. We present a series of eight specific strategies, collectively referred to as Comprehensive Quality Programming (CQP), and an overview of an effective method for using such strategies to continuously improve programs. The use of CQP will be illustrated with three examples, including an evaluation of a school-based mentoring program.

evaluation empowerment program improvement prevention 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

REFERENCES

  1. Bronfenbrenner, U., McClelland, P., Wethington, E., Moen, P., & Ceci, S. (1996). The State of Americans. New York, NY: The Free Press.Google Scholar
  2. Buford, B. & Davis, B. (1995). Shinning Stars: Prevention programs that work. Louisville, KY: Southeast Regional Center for Drug-Free Schools and Communities.Google Scholar
  3. Butterfoss, F., Goodman, R., Wandersman, A., Valois, R., & Chinman, M. (1996). The Plan Quality Index: An empowerment evaluation tool for measuring and improving the quality of plans. In Fetterman, Wandersman, and Kaftarian (Eds.) Empowerment Evaluation: Knowledge and Tools for Self-Assessment and Accountability (pp. 304–331). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc.Google Scholar
  4. Dugan, M.A. (1996) Participatory and Empowerment Evaluation: Lessons Learned in Training and Technical Assistance. In Fetterman, Wandersman, and Kaftarian (Eds.) Empowerment Evaluation: Knowledge and Tools for Self-Assessment and Accountability (pp. 277–303). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc.Google Scholar
  5. Elias, M. (1995). Primary prevention as health and social competence promotion. The Journal of Primary Prevention, 16, 5–24.Google Scholar
  6. Ennett, S., Tobler, N., Ringwalt, C., & Flewelling, R. (1994). How effective is drug abuse resistance education? A meta-analysis of Project DARE outcome evaluations. American Journal of Public Health, 84, 1394–1401.Google Scholar
  7. Family Resource Coalition (1996). Guidelines for Family Support Practice. Chicago, IL: Family Resource Coalition.Google Scholar
  8. Fetterman, D.M. (1996). Empowerment Evaluation: An Introduction to Theory and Practice. In Fetterman, Wandersman, and Kaftarian (Eds.) Empowerment Evaluation: Knowledge and Tools for Self-Assessment and Accountability (pp. 3–46). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc.Google Scholar
  9. Fetterman, D.M. (1994). Steps of empowerment evaluation: From California to Cape Town. Evaluation and Program Planning, 17, 305–313.Google Scholar
  10. General Accounting Office. (1990). Drug education: School-based programs seen as useful but impact unknown, GAO/HRD-91-27, Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office.Google Scholar
  11. Goodman, R.M., & Steckler, A. (1987). A model for the institutionalization of health promotion programs. Family and Community Health, 11, 63–78.Google Scholar
  12. Goodman, R.M., McLeroy, K.R., Steckler, A., & Hoyle, R.H. (1993). Development of Level of Institutionalization (LoIn) Scales for health promotion programs. Health Education Quarterly, 20, 161–178.Google Scholar
  13. Goodman, R.M., & Wandersman, A. (1994). FORECAST: A formative approach to evaluating community coalitions and community-based initiatives. In Kaftarian, S. and Hansen, W. (Eds.). Improving Methodologies for Evaluating Community-based Partnerships for Preventing Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug Use. Journal of Community Psychology.Google Scholar
  14. Green, L.W., & Lewis, F.M. (1986). Measurement and evaluation in health education and health promotion. Palo Alto: Mayfield Publishing Co.Google Scholar
  15. Kaskutas, L., Morgan, P., & Vaeth, P. (1992). Structural impediments in the development of community-based drug prevention program for youth: Preliminary analysis from a qualitative formative evaluation study. International Quarterly of Community Health Education, 12, 169–182.Google Scholar
  16. Kumpfer, K., Whiteside, H., & Wandersman, A. (1997). Community readiness for drug abuse prevention: Issues, tips and tools. Rockville, MD: National Institute of Drug Abuse.Google Scholar
  17. Lerner, R. M. (1995). America's youth in crisis: Challenges and options for programs and policies. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
  18. Leviton, L.C. (1994). Program theory and evaluation theory in community-based programs. Evaluation Practice, 15, 89–92.Google Scholar
  19. Linney, J.A., & Wandersman, A. (1996). Empowering community groups with evaluation skills: The Prevention Plus III Model. In Fetterman, Wandersman, and Kaftarian (Eds.) Empowerment Evaluation: Knowledge and Tools for Self-Assessment and Accountability (pp. 259–276). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc.Google Scholar
  20. Linney, J.A. & Wandersman, A. (1991). Prevention Plus-III: Assessing alcohol and other drug prevention programs at the school and community level: A four-step guide to useful program assessment. Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.Google Scholar
  21. Mark, M.M., & Pines, E. (1995). Implications of continuous quality improvement for program evaluation and evaluators. Evaluation Practice, 16, 131–139.Google Scholar
  22. Morrissey, E., & Wandersman, A. (1995). Total Quality Management in health care settings: A preliminary framework for successful implementation. In L. Ginsberg, & P. Keys (Eds.) New Management in Human Services, 2nd Ed. (pp. 171–194). Washington, DC: NASW Press.Google Scholar
  23. Nation, M. Crusto, C., Kumpher, K., Wandersman, A., Morrisey-Kane, E., Seybolt, D., & Davino, K. (in preparation). What works in prevention?: A review of the characteristics of effective prevention programs.Google Scholar
  24. National Research Council (1993). Losing generations: Adolescents in high-risk settings. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.Google Scholar
  25. Rossi, P.H., & Freeman, H.E. (1993). Evaluation: A Systematic Approach, 5th Ed. Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications.Google Scholar
  26. Soriano, F. (1995). Conducting needs assessments: A multidisciplinary approach. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
  27. Steckler, A., Allegrante, J., Altman, D., Brown, R., Burdine, J., Gooman, R., & Jorgensen, C. (1995). Health education intervention strategies: Recommendations for future research. Health Education Quarterly, 22, 307–329.Google Scholar
  28. Stevenson, J., Mitchell, R.E. & Florin, P. (1996). Evaluation and self-direction in community prevention coalitions. In Fetterman, Wandersman, and Kaftarian (Eds.) Empowerment Evaluation: Knowledge and Tools for Self-Assessment and Accountability (pp. 208–233). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc.Google Scholar
  29. U.S. Advisory Board on Child Abuse and Neglect (1995). A Nation's Shame: Fatal child abuse and neglect in the United States. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Administration for Children and Families. Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  30. Weissberg, R., & Elias, M. (1993). Enhancing young people's social competence and health behavior: An important challenge for educators, scientists, policymakers, and funders. Applied & Preventive Psychology, 2, 179–190.Google Scholar
  31. Witlein, B., & Altschuld, J. (1995). Planning and conducting needs assessments. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Abraham Wandersman
    • 1
  • Erin Morrissey
    • 1
  • Katrina Davino
    • 1
  • Diana Seybolt
    • 1
  • Cindy Crusto
    • 1
  • Maury Nation
    • 1
  • Robert Goodman
    • 2
  • Pamela Imm
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of South CarolinaColumbia
  2. 2.Department of Community Health SciencesTulane University School of Public Health and Tropical MedicineNew Orleans

Personalised recommendations