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African Archaeological Review

, Volume 14, Issue 4, pp 257–262 | Cite as

Book Review Late Pleistocene and Holocene Hunter-Gatherers of the Matopos: An Archaeological Study of Change and Continuity in Zimbabwe (Societas Archaeologica Upsaliensis, Studies in African Archaeology 10). By N. J. Walker. Uppsala, 1995 134 Figures, 24 Plates, 122 Tables. ISSN 0284-5040. ISBN 91-506-1102-x.

  • Peter Mitchell
Article

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REFERENCES

  1. Armstrong, A. L. (1931). Rhodesian Archaeological Expedition (1929): Excavation in Bambata Cave and researches on prehistoric sites in Southern Rhodesia. Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute 61: 239–276.Google Scholar
  2. Cooke, C. K. (1975). The Rhodesian Stone Age succession. Proceedings of the Pan-African Congress for Prehistory 6: 36–46.Google Scholar
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  8. Walker, N. J. (1990). Zimbabwe at 18,000 BP. In Gamble, C., and Soffer, O. (eds.), The World at 18,000 B.P. Vol. 2. Low Latitudes, Unwin, Hyman, London, pp. 206–213.Google Scholar
  9. Walker, N. J. (1994a). Painting and ceremonial activity in the Later Stone Age of the Matopos, Zimbabwe. In Dowson, T. A., and Lewis-Williams, J. D. (eds.), Contested Images: Diversity in Southern African Rock Art Research, Witwatersrand University Press, Johannesburg, pp. 119–130.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Mitchell
    • 1
  1. 1.Pitt Rivers MuseumOxfordUnited Kingdom

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