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The Review of Austrian Economics

, Volume 15, Issue 4, pp 263–274 | Cite as

Information and Knowledge: Austrian Economics in Search of its Uniqueness

  • Peter J. Boettke
Article

Abstract

The Austrian School of Economics since WWII has increasingly claimed a unique position within the scientific community of economists. This paper argues that the most persuasive way to make this claim to uniqueness is to focus on the distinction scholars in the Austrian tradition place between information and knowledge in their work. In other words, it is the epistemic-cognitive turn that the Austrian school took in the wake of the socialist calculation debate that separates the school from other branches of neo-classicism within economic science that constitutes its best case for analytical uniqueness.

Austrian economics knowledge information entrepreneurship market process 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter J. Boettke
    • 1
  1. 1.James M. Buchanan Center for Political Economy, Department of Economics, MSN 3G4George Mason UniversityFairfaxUSA

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