Advertisement

Chromosome Research

, Volume 10, Issue 1, pp 83–86 | Cite as

The Nature and Destiny of Translocated B-Chromosome-Specific Satellite DNA of Rye

  • Robert Hasterok
  • Glyn Jenkins
  • Tim Langdon
  • R. Neil Jones
Article

Abstract

Translocations of A chromosome-specific and B chromosome-specific satellite DNA were tracked by fluorescence in situ hybridisation from an irradiated M1 generation of an experimental population of rye (Secale cereale L.) to its M2 progeny. Although high frequencies of large structural rearrangements were detected in root-tip meristems of M1 plants, none was present at meiosis or in somatic cells of their progeny. These results are interpreted in terms of efficient "filtering" of translocations during vegetative development, and not in the more usual terms of meiosis presenting a physical barrier to structural variants. These observations highlight the fact that B–A translocations are not tolerated, and may explain why this form of chromosome mutation is largely absent from natural populations.

B chromosome meiosis satellite DNA Secale cereale translocation 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Cuadrado A, Jouve N (1997) Distribution of highly repeated DNA sequences in species of the genus Secale. Genome 40: 309–317.Google Scholar
  2. Gerlach WL, Dyer TA (1980) Sequence organization of the repeating units in the nucleus of wheat which contain 5S rRNA genes. Nucleic Acids Res 11;8(21): 4851–4865.Google Scholar
  3. Hasterok R, Jenkins G, Langdon T, Jones RN, Maluszynska J (2001) Ribosomal DNA is an effective marker of Brassica chromosomes. Theor Appl Genet 103: 486–490.Google Scholar
  4. Jones RN, Rees H (1982) B-chromosomes. London: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  5. Langdon T, Seago Ch, Jones RN et al. (2000) De novo evolution of satellite DNA on rye B chromosome. Genetics 154: 869–884.Google Scholar
  6. Puertas MJ, Baeza F (1983) Translocations between A and B chromosomes or rye. In: Kew Chromosome Conference II. George Allen & Unwin, pp. 359.Google Scholar
  7. Sandery MJ, Forster JW, Blunden R, Jones RN (1990) Identi-fication of a family of repeated sequences on the rye B chromosome. Genome 33: 908–913.Google Scholar
  8. Tsujimoto H, Niwa K (1992) DNA-structure of the B-chromosome of rye revealed by in situ hybridisation using repetitive sequences. Jpn J Genet 67: 233–241.Google Scholar
  9. Vershinin A, Schwarzacher T, Heslop-Harrison JS (1995) The large-scale genomic organisation of repetitive DNA families at the telomeres of rye chromosomes. Plant Cell 7: 1823–1833.Google Scholar
  10. Wilkes TM, Francki MG, Langridge P, Karp A, Jones RN, Forster JW (1995) Analysis of rye B-chromosomes using fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH). Chromosome Res 3(8): 466–472.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert Hasterok
    • 1
  • Glyn Jenkins
    • 2
  • Tim Langdon
    • 2
  • R. Neil Jones
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Plant Anatomy and CytologyUniversity of SilesiaKatowicePoland
  2. 2.Institute of Biological SciencesUniversity of WalesAberystwyth, CeredigionUK

Personalised recommendations