Advertisement

Theoretical and Practical Perspectives for the Future of Educational and Vocational Guidance in Australia

  • Wendy Patton
  • Mary McMahon
Article

Abstract

This article highlights therelationship between social change andeducational and vocational guidance provision,and emphasises the theoretical and practicalimperative to renew and refocus educational andvocational (career) guidance services. Afterdescribing the major influences on a changingeducational and vocational guidance nature andprovision, it describes a number of specificdevelopments in Australia.

Keywords

Social Change Major Influence Practical Perspective Vocational Guidance Guidance Service 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. AEC (Australian Education Council) Review Committee (Finn Report). (1991). Young people's participation in post-compulsory education and training. Canberra: Australian Government Publishing Service.Google Scholar
  2. Australian Education Council (1992). Career education in Australian schools: national goals, student, school and system outcomes and evaluative arrangements. Canberra: Author.Google Scholar
  3. Career Education Association of Victoria/Dusseldorp Skills Forum. (1997). Career education and guidance for the next millennium. Melbourne: Author.Google Scholar
  4. Chartrand, J. M., & Rose, M. L. (1996). Career interventions for at-risk populations: Incorporating social cognitive influences. The Career Development Quarterly, 44, 341–353.Google Scholar
  5. Collett, I. (1997). Implications of rural location on career development. In W. Patton & M. McMahon (Eds.), Career development in practice: a systems theory perspective(pp. 71–82). Sydney: New Hobsons Press.Google Scholar
  6. Collin, A. (1996). Rethinking the relationship between theory and practice: practitioners as map-readers, map-makers – or jazz players? British Journal of Guidance and Counselling, 24, 67–81.Google Scholar
  7. Collin, A., & Watts, A. G. (1996). The death and transfiguration of career – and of career guidance? British Journal of Guidance and Counselling, 24(3), 385–398.Google Scholar
  8. Davis, D., & Braithwaite, R. (1990). Career education in Australian schools. Ryde, Sydney: CREW.Google Scholar
  9. Department for Education and Employment (1995). Better choices: putting principles into practice. Sheffield, U.K.: Author.Google Scholar
  10. Donohue, R., & Patton, W. (1998). The effectiveness of a career guidance program with longterm unemployed individuals. Journal of Employment Counselling, 35, 179–194.Google Scholar
  11. Education.au (2001). National Career Information System Business Plan. Dulwich, SA: Author.Google Scholar
  12. Education Queensland. (1999). Review of the provision of career guidance in Education Queensland schools. Brisbane: Author.Google Scholar
  13. Ellyard, P. (1993, July). Education 2020: preparing for the 21st century. Paper presented at the Australian Guidance and Counselling Association N.S.W. State Guidance Conference, Sydney, Australia.Google Scholar
  14. Feller, R., & Walz, G. (Eds.) (1996). Career transitions in turbulent times: exploring work, learning and careers. Greensboro, NC: ERIC Clearinghouse.Google Scholar
  15. Furness, J. (1999). Incolink: training, employment and careers unit. Australian Journal of Career Development, 8, 5–8.Google Scholar
  16. Gibson, D. (2000). Narrative strategies in career education. Australian Journal of Career Development, 9(1), 35–39.Google Scholar
  17. Hackett, G. (1993). Career counselling and psychotherapy: false dichotomies and recommended remedies. Journal of Career Assessment, 1, 105–117.Google Scholar
  18. Hall, D. T. (Ed.) (1996). The career is dead-long live the career: a relational approach to careers. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  19. Handy, C. B. (1985). Understanding organizations (3rd ed.). London: Penguin.Google Scholar
  20. Handy, C. B. (1991). The age of unreason. London: Arrow Business Books.Google Scholar
  21. Hansen, L. S. (1999). Beyond school to work: continuing contributions of theory and practice to career development of youth. The Career Development Quarterly, 47, 353–358.Google Scholar
  22. Hart, G., & Morgan, C. (1977). National Career Education Conference report. Canberra: Curriculum Development Centre.Google Scholar
  23. Herr, E. L. (1992). Emerging trends in career counselling. International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling, 15, 255–288.Google Scholar
  24. Herr, E. L. (1997). Perspectives on career guidance and counselling in the 21st century. Educational and Vocational Guidance Bulletin, 60, 1–15.Google Scholar
  25. Krumboltz, J. D. (1993). Integrating career counselling and personal counselling. The Career Development Quarterly, 42, 143–148.Google Scholar
  26. Lent, R. W., Brown, S. D., & Hackett, G. (1994). Toward a unifying theory of career and academic interest, choice and performance. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 45, 79–122.Google Scholar
  27. Lim, R. (1997). Multicultural considerations in career counselling. In W. Patton & M. McMahon (Eds.), Career development in practice: a systems theory perspective (pp. 95–104). Sydney: New Hobsons Press.Google Scholar
  28. Mahoney, M. J., & Patterson, K. M. (1992). Changing theories of change: Recent developments in counselling. In S. D. Brown & R. W. Lent (Eds.), Handbook of counselling psychology (2nd ed.) (pp. 665–689). NY: John Wiley.Google Scholar
  29. McCowan, C., & Hyndman, K. (1998). A career advisory system for Australia? Summary of a review. Australian Journal of Career Development, 7(1), 35–41.Google Scholar
  30. McCowan, C., & McKenzie, M. (1997). The guide to career education (2nd ed.). North Sydney: New Hobsons Press.Google Scholar
  31. McMahon, M., & Carroll, J. (1999a). Constructing a framework for a K-12 developmental career education program. Australian Journal of Career Development, 8(2), 42–46.Google Scholar
  32. McMahon, M., & Carroll, J. (1999b). Implementing a K-12 developmental career education program. Australian Journal of Career Development, 8(3), 38–45.Google Scholar
  33. McMahon, M., & Patton, W. (2000). Beyond 2000: Incorporating the constructivist influence into career guidance and counselling. Australian Journal of Career Development, 9(1), 25–29.Google Scholar
  34. McMahon, M., & Patton, W. (2002a). The changing world of career assessment: The use of qualitative assessment instruments. International Journal for Educational and Vocational Guidance, 2(1), 51–66.Google Scholar
  35. McMahon, M., & Patton, W. (2002b). Supervision: Lifelong learning for career counsellors. In M. McMahon & W. Patton (Eds.), Supervision in the helping professions: a practical guide (pp. 235–248). Sydney: Pearson Education Australia.Google Scholar
  36. Ministerial Council for Employment, Education, Training and Youth Affairs Career Education Taskforce (1998). Draft report. Canberra: Author.Google Scholar
  37. Ministerial Council for Employment, Education, Training and Youth Affairs (1999). The Adelaide declaration on national goals for schooling in the twenty-first century. Canberra: Author.Google Scholar
  38. Ministerial Council for Employment, Education, Training and Youth Affairs (2000). Report. Canberra: Author.Google Scholar
  39. Morgan, C., & Hart, G. (1977). Career education in Australia. Cambridge, U.K.: Hobsons Press.Google Scholar
  40. National Board of Employment, Education and Training. (1991). Strengthening careers education in schools. Canberra: Australian Government Publishing Service.Google Scholar
  41. Ozanne, E. (2001). Lifelong career development: First, second and third generation retirement programs in an ageing society. In W. Patton & M. McMahon (Eds.), Career development programs: preparation for lifelong career decision making (pp. 114–124). Camberwell, VIC: ACER Press.Google Scholar
  42. Patton, W., & Creed, P. (2001). Developmental issues in career maturity and career decisionmaking readiness. The Career Development Quarterly, 49, 336–351.Google Scholar
  43. Patton, W., & McMahon, M. (1999). Career development and systems theory: a new relationship. Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole.Google Scholar
  44. Patton, W., & McMahon, M. (Eds.) (2001). Career development programs: preparation for lifelong career decision making. Camberwell, VIC: ACER Press.Google Scholar
  45. Patton, W., Watson, M. B., & Creed, P. A. (2001). Career maturity of Australian and South African high school students: developmental and contextual explanations. Manuscript submitted for publication.Google Scholar
  46. Prideaux, L. (2001). The Career Choice Cycle Course: an amalgamation of social cognitive theory and career education practice. In W. Patton & M. McMahon (Eds.), Career development programs: preparation for lifelong career decision making (pp. 58–72). Camberwell, VIC: ACER Press.Google Scholar
  47. Santic, S. (2000). Career development program in Queensland Transport: a case study. Australian Journal of Career Development, 9(1), 3–7.Google Scholar
  48. Sarra, C. (1997). Systems theory and the Aboriginal career decision-maker. In W. Patton & M. McMahon (Eds.), Career development in practice: a systems theory perspective (pp. 59–70). Sydney: New Hobsons Press.Google Scholar
  49. Savickas, M. L. (1997). Career adaptability: an integrative construct for life-span, life-space theory. The Career Development Quarterly, 45, 247–259.Google Scholar
  50. Savickas, M. L., & Walsh, W. B. (Eds.) (1996). Handbook of career counselling theory and practice. Palo Alto, CA: Davies-Black.Google Scholar
  51. Shears, M. (1996). Career education state by state. Australian Journal of Career Dvelopment, 5, 3–4.Google Scholar
  52. Stead, G. B., & Watson, M. B. (1998). The appropriateness of super's career theory among black South Africans. South African Journal of Psychology, 28(1), 40–43.Google Scholar
  53. Subich, L. M. (1993). How personal is career counselling? [Special section]. The Career Development Quarterly, 42, 129–131.Google Scholar
  54. Watts, A. G., Guichard, J., Plant, P., & Rodruigez, M. L. (1994). Educational and vocational guidance in the European Community. Luxemburg: Office for Official Publications of the European Communities.Google Scholar
  55. Watts, A. G. (1996). Toward a policy of lifelong career development: a translantic perspective. The Career Development Quarterly , 45(1), 41–53.Google Scholar
  56. Vondracek, F.W., Lerner, R.M., & Schulenberg, J. E. (1986). Career development: a life-span developmental approach. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wendy Patton
    • 1
  • Mary McMahon
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Cognitive Processes in LearningQueensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove CampusAustralia

Personalised recommendations