International Journal of Stress Management

, Volume 8, Issue 3, pp 179–200 | Cite as

Stress Management with Law Enforcement Personnel: A Controlled Outcome Study of EMDR Versus a Traditional Stress Management Program

  • Sandra A. Wilson
  • Robert H. Tinker
  • Lee A. Becker
  • Carol R. Logan
Article
  • 125 Downloads

Abstract

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) has been shown to be effective for treating posttraumatic stress disorder, but its efficacy as a stress management tool for normal individuals in highly stressful occupations has not been demonstrated. Sixty-two police officers were randomly assigned to either EMDR or a standard stress management program (SMP), each consisting of 6 hours of individualized contact. At completion, officers in the EMDR condition provided lower ratings on measures of PTSD symptoms, subjective distress, job stress, and anger; and higher marital satisfaction ratings than those in SMP. The effects of EMDR were maintained at the 6-month follow-up, indicating enduring gains from a relatively brief treatment regimen for this subclinical sample of officers who were experiencing some level of stress from their job.

EMDR desensitization stress management police officers controlled outcome study 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sandra A. Wilson
    • 1
  • Robert H. Tinker
    • 2
  • Lee A. Becker
    • 3
  • Carol R. Logan
    • 4
  1. 1.Spencer Curtis FoundationColorado SpringsUSA
  2. 2.Spencer Curtis FoundationColorado Springs
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyColorado UniversityColorado Springs
  4. 4.Colorado Springs Police DepartmentColorado Springs

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