Genetic Resources and Crop Evolution

, Volume 48, Issue 3, pp 307–314 | Cite as

Intergeneric relationships in the Australian Vitaceae: new evidence from cpDNA analysis

  • Maurizio Rossetto
  • Betsy R. Jackes
  • Kirsten D. Scott
  • Robert J. Henry
Article

Abstract

Taxa related to important agricultural species are likely to contain a considerable amount of potentially valuable genetic diversity. Nevertheless, before breeding programs or gene discovery projects can be initiated it is important to understand the phylogenetic relationships between the species involved. A component of a major gene discovery project in grapes at the Centre for Plant Conservation Genetics (Southern Cross University, Australia) is directed at the discovery of novel genes in native Vitaceae. As a result a study was conducted in order to assess the phylogenetic relationships between V. vinifera and the native members of the three major Australian genera: Cayratia, Cissus and Tetrastigma. CpDNA sequence analysis (from the trnL intron) adequately resolved intergeneric relationship between the majority of the species studied and provided some useful new information on the phylogenetic relationships within the Vitaceae. This preliminary project identified two species, C. hypoglauca and C. sterculiifolia, as being closely related to V. vinifera and worthy of further in-depth investigation.

Cayratia chloroplast DNA Cissus grapes Tetrastigma trnL (UAA) 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maurizio Rossetto
    • 1
  • Betsy R. Jackes
    • 1
  • Kirsten D. Scott
  • Robert J. Henry
  1. 1.Tropical Plant SciencesJames Cook UniversityTownsvilleAustralia

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