User Modeling in Human–Computer Interaction

  • Gerhard Fischer
Article

Abstract

A fundamental objective of human–computer interaction research is to make systems more usable, more useful, and to provide users with experiences fitting their specific background knowledge and objectives. The challenge in an information-rich world is not only to make information available to people at any time, at any place, and in any form, but specifically to say the “right” thing at the “right” time in the “right” way. Designers of collaborative human–computer systems face the formidable task of writing software for millions of users (at design time) while making it work as if it were designed for each individual user (only known at use time). User modeling research has attempted to address these issues. In this article, I will first review the objectives, progress, and unfulfilled hopes that have occurred over the last ten years, and illustrate them with some interesting computational environments and their underlying conceptual frameworks. A special emphasis is given to high-functionality applications and the impact of user modeling to make them more usable, useful, and learnable. Finally, an assessment of the current state of the art followed by some future challenges is given.

user modeling human computer interaction collaborative human-computer systems high functionality applications adaptive and adaptable systems active help systems critiquing systems design environments 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gerhard Fischer
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for LifeLong Learning & Design (L3D), Department of Computer Science and Institute of Cognitive ScienceUniversity of Colorado at BoulderBoulderU.S.A.

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