Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education

, Volume 3, Issue 3, pp 205–224 | Cite as

Conceptualising Resources as a Theme for Teacher Education

  • Jill Adler

Abstract

In this report, I examine resources and their use in school mathematics. I do so from the perspective of mathematics teacher education and with a view to the practice of school mathematics. I argue that the effectiveness of resources for mathematical learning lies in their use, that is, in the classroom teaching and learning context. The argument pivots on the concepts of school mathematics as a hybrid practice and on the transparency of resources in use. These concepts are elaborated by examples of resource use within an in-service teacher education research project in South Africa. I propose that mathematics teacher education needs to focus more attention on resources, on what they are and how they work as an extension of the teacher in school mathematics practice. In so doing, the report provides a language with which mathematics teacher educators and mathematics teachers can investigate teachers' use of resources to support mathematical learning in particular and diverse contexts.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jill Adler
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of MathematicsUniversity of the WitwatersrandSouth Africa

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