Journal of Gambling Studies

, Volume 16, Issue 4, pp 453–460 | Cite as

Brief Communications Analysis of a Casino's Self-Exclusion Program

  • Robert Ladouceur
  • Christian Jacques
  • Isabelle Giroux
  • Francine Ferland
  • Jean Leblond

Abstract

As gambling facilities become more available, the number of pathological gamblers increases. Effective therapeutic and preventive interventions should be developed and systematically evaluated. Self-exclusion programs may be a useful means to facilitate self-control among problem gamblers. This paper describes the characteristics of individuals who decided to bar themselves from a Canadian casino. Two hundred twenty individuals participated in the present study and completed a questionnaire including four sections: (1) socio-demographic data, (2) the South Oaks Gambling Screen, (3) gambling habits, and (4) prior experiences with the self-exclusion program. According to the SOGS, 95% of the participants were classified as severe pathological gamblers on the SOGS (Mean score = 9.87). Furthermore, based on self-reported observation, 30% of the participants completely stopped gambling once enrolled in this program. No one scored within the interval of non-problem gamblers. Suggestions to improve self-exclusion programs are discussed.

casino gambling self-exclusion problem gambler 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert Ladouceur
    • 1
  • Christian Jacques
    • 2
  • Isabelle Giroux
    • 2
  • Francine Ferland
    • 2
  • Jean Leblond
    • 2
  1. 1.Ecole de PsychologieUniversité LavalSte-FoyCanada
  2. 2.Université LavalCanada

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