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Journal of Child and Family Studies

, Volume 9, Issue 1, pp 7–25 | Cite as

Exposure to Community Violence: Defining the Problem and Understanding the Consequences

  • Stacy Overstreet
Article

Abstract

Exposure to community violence has emerged as a major risk factor for the development of emotional and behavioral problems in children and adolescents. In the past decade, there has been a proliferation of research within the fields of medicine, sociology, and psychology documenting the rates and consequences of exposure to community violence. This interdisciplinary growth has led to a great deal of variability within the field of exposure to community violence, making it difficult to glean general conclusions regarding rates and impact of exposure. This review advances the current understanding of exposure to community violence by integrating findings across disciplines as well as reviewing the few studies that have provided initial explanatory information regarding mediators and moderators of the relationship between exposure to community violence and its associated outcomes.

community violence children adolescents emotional problems behavioral problems 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stacy Overstreet
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyTulane UniversityNew OrleansUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyTulane UniversityNew OrleansUSA

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