Chromosome Research

, Volume 8, Issue 1, pp 73–76 | Cite as

Ty1-copia-retrotransposon Behavior in a Polyploid Cotton

  • Robert E. Hanson
  • M. Nurul Islam-Faridi
  • Charles F. Crane
  • Michael S. Zwick
  • Don G. Czeschin
  • Jonathan F. Wendel
  • Thomas D. McKnight
  • H. James Price
  • David M. Stelly
Article

Abstract

Retrotransposons constitute a ubiquitous and dynamic component of plant genomes. Intragenomic and intergenomic comparisons of related genomes offer potential insights into retrotransposon behavior and genomic effects. Here, we have used fluorescent in-situ hybridization to determine the chromosomal distributions of a Ty1-copia-like retrotransposon in the cotton AD-genome tetraploid Gossypium hirsutum and closely related putative A- and D-genome diploid ancestors. Retrotransposon clone A108 hybridized to all G. hirsutum chromosomes, approximately equal in intensity in the A- and D-subgenomes. Similar results were obtained by hybridization of A108 to the A-genome diploid G. arboreum, whereas no signal was detected on chromosomes of the D-genome diploid G. raimondii. The significance and potential causes of these observations are discussed.

evolution genome Gossypium polyploidization repetitive element retrotransposon 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert E. Hanson
    • 1
  • M. Nurul Islam-Faridi
    • 1
  • Charles F. Crane
    • 1
  • Michael S. Zwick
    • 1
  • Don G. Czeschin
    • 1
  • Jonathan F. Wendel
    • 2
  • Thomas D. McKnight
    • 3
  • H. James Price
    • 1
  • David M. Stelly
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Soil and Crop SciencesTexas A&M UniversityCollege StationUSA
  2. 2.Department of BotanyIowa State UniversityAmesUSA
  3. 3.Department of BiologyTexas A&M UniversityCollege StationUSA

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