Plant Foods for Human Nutrition

, Volume 52, Issue 2, pp 109–118 | Cite as

Safety of tomatillos and products containing tomatillos canned by the water-bath canning method

  • L. H. McKee
  • M. D. Remmenga
  • M. A. Bock
Article

Abstract

Three studies were conducted to evaluate the safety of tomatillos and products containing tomatillos canned by the water-bath processing method. In the first study, plain tomatillos were processed for 25, 37.5, 50 and 62.5 min. In the second study, five tomatillo/onion combinations were prepared while five tomatillo/green chile combinations were prepared in the third study. pH evaluations were conducted to determine safety in all studies using pH 4.2 as the cut-off value. No differences in the pH of plain tomatillos were detected due to processing time. All jars of plain tomatillos had pH values below 4.1. All combinations of tomatillos/onions and tomatillos/green chile containing more than 50% tomatillo had pH values below the 4.2 cut-off value. Results of the three studies indicate (1) acidification of plain tomatillos is probably unnecessary for canning by the water-bath processing method and (2) combinations of acidic tomatillos and low-acid onions or green chile must contain more than 50% tomatillos to have a pH low enough for safe water-bath processing.

Green chile Onions pH Tomatillos Water-bath canning 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. H. McKee
    • 1
  • M. D. Remmenga
    • 2
  • M. A. Bock
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Family and Consumer SciencesNew Mexico State UniversityLas CrucesUSA
  2. 2.University Statistics CenterNew Mexico State UniversityLas Cruces

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