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Cytotechnology

, Volume 24, Issue 1, pp 19–30 | Cite as

On-line immunoanalysis of monoclonal antibodies during a continuous culture of hybridoma cells

  • Jens J. van der Pol
  • Marc Machnik
  • Manfred Biselli
  • Theresa Portela-Klein
  • Cornelis D. de Gooijer
  • Johannes Tramper
  • Christian Wandrey
Article

Abstract

The monoclonal-antibody production of an immobilized hybridoma cell line cultivated in a fluidized-bed reactor was monitored on-line for nearly 900 h. The monoclonal antibody concentration was determined by an immuno affinity-chromatography method (ABICAP). Antibodies directed against the product, e.g. IgG, were immobilized on a micro-porous gel and packed in small columns. After all IgG present in the sample was bound to the immobilized antibodies, unbound proteins were removed by rinsing the column. Elution of the bound antibodies followed and the antibodies were determined by fluorescence. The analytical procedure was automated with a robotic device to enable on-line measurements. The correlation between the on-line determined data and antibody concentrations measured by HPLC was linear.

A sampling system was constructed, which was based on a pneumatically actuated in-line membrane valve integrated into the circulation loop of the reactor. Separation of the cells from the sample stream was achieved by a depth filter made of glass-fibre, situated outside the reactor. Rapid obstruction of the filter by cells or cell debris and contamination of the sample system was avoided by intermittent rinsing of the sample system with a chemical solution. The intermittent rinsing of the filter, which had a surface of 4.8 cm2, resulted in an operational capacity of up to 40 samples (1.0 l total sample volume). Both the sampling system and the analytical device functioned without failure during this long-term culture.

The culture temperature was varied between 34 and 40 °C. Raising the temperature from 34 up to 37 °C resulted in a simultaneous increase of growth and specific antibody production rate. Specific metabolic rates of glucose, lactate, glutamine and ammonium stayed constant in this temperature range. A further enhancement of temperature up to 40 °C had a negative effect on the growth rate, whereas the specific monoclonal antibody production rate showed a small increase. The other specific metabolic rates also increased in the temperature range between 38 to 40 °C.

fluidized-bed reactor monoclonal antibody on-line monitoring sample system temperature 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jens J. van der Pol
    • 1
  • Marc Machnik
    • 1
  • Manfred Biselli
    • 1
  • Theresa Portela-Klein
    • 2
  • Cornelis D. de Gooijer
    • 3
  • Johannes Tramper
    • 3
  • Christian Wandrey
    • 1
  1. 1.Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbHInstitute of BiotechnologyJülichGermany
  2. 2.ABION GmbHTechnology Center JülichJülichGermany
  3. 3.Food and Bioprocess Engineering groupWageningen Agricultural UniversityWageningenthe Netherlands

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