Journal of Primary Prevention

, Volume 21, Issue 2, pp 285–303 | Cite as

Cultural Considerations in Family-Based Primary Prevention Programs in Drug Abuse

  • William L. Turner
Article

Abstract

America has been seen as a place where people from distinct ethnic and cultural groups are synthesized into one composite American culture that both includes and reflects the values, norms and mores of everyone. However, the evolution of a consensus model of ethnic and cultural fusion has failed to materialize; with many groups tenaciously adhering to their value, belief, and behavior systems of origin. Because of the degree of tenacity to which these differences have been retained, it is imperative that sufficient effort be exerted toward a clarification and an appreciation of the function of race, ethnicity, and culture in problem occurrence, prevention, and treatment. However, this clarification has not proven itself to be an easy task. Too often, the concepts of race, culture, and ethnicity are not treated as distinct in the literature, which can be confusing and problematic in determining the most appropriate methodological and analytical approach to the research. This article will discuss some of the etiological and methodological issues associated with planning, conducting, and the dissemination of family-based, drug abuse prevention programs with ethnic minorities.

culture ethnicity family prevention drug abuse 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • William L. Turner
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Family StudiesUniversity of KentuckyLexington

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