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African Archaeological Review

, Volume 18, Issue 1, pp 1–47 | Cite as

Who's “That Girl”: British, South African, and American Women as Africanist Archaeologists in Colonial Africa (1860s–1960s)

  • Kathryn Weedman
Article
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Abstract

This paper reviews the accomplishments of British, South African, and American women Africanist archaeologists who worked between the 1860s and the 1960s. Despite their many significant contributions to African archaeological method and theory, especially those exposing the importance of indigenous populations to their own cultural development, the work of these women tends to be either appropriated or ignored by their contemporaries and by present day archaeologists. A postcolonial feminist analysis draws on the colonial context in which African archaeology developed and the continued Western domination of the discipline to provide a background for understanding how and why these women are omitted from historiographies of African archaeology.

Cette étude revise les accomplissements des femmes archéologues Africanistes anglaises, sudafricaines et Americaines, qui travaillaient entre les années 1860 et les années 1960. Malgré leurs plusieurs contributions d'importance à la méthode et la théorie de l'archéologie Africaine, en particulier celles qui exposaient l'importance à leur propre développement culturel des populations indigènes, leurs travaux tendent à être ou appropriés ou ignorés par leurs contemporains ou par les archaéologues d'aujourd'hui. Une analyse féministe post-coloniale utilise le contexte colonial dans lequel l'archéologie Africaine s'est développée, et la domination occidentale soutenue de cette discipline, à fournir une base pour comprendre comment et pourquoi ces femmes ont éeté omises des historiographies de l'archéologie Africaine.

women in archaeology history and theory of African archaeology colonialism feminism 

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© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kathryn Weedman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of FloridaGainesville

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